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Seattle Police Department Finally Free

“Seattle Police Finally Free” by John F Hays, a Seattle Private Investigator.

Now that Mayor McGinn is on the way out, the Seattle Police Department has been freed up to deal with the bad boys and girls hanging out and causing serious trouble in Westlake Park. With the lame and irrelevant excuse that we can’t criminalize being poor and homeless, the SPD was constrained from dealing with the criminal and anti-social behavior that’s been causing problems for downtown businesses and visitors. I guess McGinn forgot the admonition “Love the child (person); hate the behavior”. It’s about time!

 

Seattle Mayor finds scapegoating guns easier than going after root causes of violence

Seattle Mayor finds scapegoating guns easier than going after root causes by John F Hays, a Seattle Private Investigator.

It’s really disappointing, but not unexpected, that Mayor McGinn’s gun control response to recent shootings in Seattle is to blame inanimate objects for the violence, rather than the complex social problems that drive the behavior of people who respond to life with violent acts.

Violence is an ever-present problem that has root causes that have nothing to do with the tools used to act out in violence. The tools reflect the technological level of society. Violent behavior reflects the social conditions of society from the national level down to the level of local communities and individual families.

Blaming guns is what you do when you don’t have the ability or the will to tackle root causes and want a scapegoat to deflect attention from your impotence. Deputy Police Chief Nick Metz and Assistant Chief for Operations Paul McDonagh blame the gun, as well (seattletimes.nwso…); but this is just politically expedient, coded speech to deflect citizen ire from the Mayor and the police.

The Mayor and the Seattle Police Department are no more at fault for the recent violence than are the rest of us. Since they don’t seem to be able to lead, where are the leaders who can direct our attention and efforts away from useless, easy-answer, non-solutions and towards addressing the underlying social issues that create violent people?

See my earlier blog posts on the topic:

Guns, Violence and Society – Family and Community Level Solutions

The Gun Violence Fantasies of Seattle Mayor

Guns, Violence and Society – Causes

Guns, Violence and Society – Addiction

Guns, Violence and Society

Domestic Violence – Protection Orders Useless?

I have two more posts coming on the same topic. The last in the string (the second to come) will specifically address guns.

 

Guns, Violence and Society – Addiction

Guns, Violence and Society – Addiction By: John F Hays, a Seattle Private Investigator

In spite of the best efforts of my history and civics instructors, I eventually found out that they lied and distorted many things about the history and government of my country of birth. They didn’t do this out of malice. They were doing no more than unconsciously engaging in the propaganda and indoctrination that they were subjected to in their own educations. It’s what the political classes do in every country. The victors not only get the spoils; they get to write or rewrite history, the revisionist history that glorifies the winners and ignores or justifies all the less than glorious truths behind their “victories”.

I’ve been around for more than 66 years and I’ve been paying attention for most of that time. I credit my political awakening to the Jesuits who ran my high school and the first university I attended. Though I am no longer a Catholic or a Christian, I greatly appreciate Jesuit involvement in my intellectual development, such as it is. They taught me two things that inform my way of thinking to this day. They taught me how to think, as opposed to what to think; and they taught me to question authority. These are dangerous traits, but are, in fact, essential to citizenship in a democracy. How can we learn and advance as a nation if we don’t know the truth about our past and the current machinations of those in power? How can we aspire to match the potential espoused in our high and mighty principles if we aren’t willing to look at our failures at living by those principles?

Our history starts with an invasion and the forceful taking of land belonging to indigenous peoples. By violent revolution, we broke away from an onerous overseas government. We continued our violent subjugation of the indigenous people, an effort that continues, in a somewhat less overt way, to this day. We fought wars to establish our northern and southern borders. We fought an internal war over the economic and human rights issue of slavery. We’ve had labor wars. We’ve had outbreaks of violence directed against voluntary and involuntary immigrants (Africans, Chinese, Japanese, Hispanics, Irish etc). We’ve experienced political assassinations and attempts at assassination. We’ve fought numerous foreign wars, some seemingly justified, some not. Violent crime, domestic violence, sexual violence, gang violence, road rage, highway carnage fueled by alcohol and drugs, the Drug War, the list goes on.

Modern culture is rife with violence and we wallow in it willingly. Movies, TV, music, games, sports, all glory in violence. Billions are spent producing and consuming violence. We honor and pay handsomely the actors, singers and athletes who feed our blood lust.

We are a product of violence…and we love it.

The debate continues over the effect of media depictions of violence on human behavior, especially that of our children. Now we are debating whether violent and hateful political speech can influence or cause violent behavior. We love to debate. We hate to actually engage collectively in defining problems that can be solved, finding real solutions and doing the hard work to attain them.

We are like alcoholics; and like alcoholics, we must admit to our addiction to violence before we can begin the journey to a cure. As a citizen, I have a stake in this situation. As a Seattle private investigator, working mostly in criminal defense, the stake I have has become more clear and tangible.

 

Domestic Violence – Protection Orders Useless?

Domestic Violence – Protection Orders Useless? by John F. Hays, a Seattle Private Investigator.

Having worked on a number of domestic violence cases over the years and being an avid reader of crime related news, it is quite obvious that the whole behavioral and crime category of domestic violence is very complex. As a practical matter, it seems to be beyond the ability of law enforcement and the courts to effectively deal with the problem or, more correctly, the complex of problems associated with the issue. Two things stand out to me as particularly problematic.

First: A protection or no-contact order is a very tenuous form of protection against future violence by a perpetrator against the same victim. My experience as a private investigator is that the orders are frequently violated by both parties, in collusion. From all the cases we’ve read or heard about over the years, it is sadly obvious that a violent person, intent on injuring or killing his or her victim, is not deterred by fear of legal consequences based on a bit of dead tree with some words printed on it.

Second: Victims of domestic violence are not easy to categorize. Some are mentally healthy, normal people who make the mistake of hooking up with people who later turn out to be violent. In spite of all their efforts to deal with the problem, these people sometimes fall prey to more harassment and violence from the same person. Some domestic violence victims have complex, personal psychological issues that result in their choosing to have co-dependent relationships with violent people. Too often they either return to the same relationship or find another person with whom to form another co-dependent relationship.

There is an old adage that goes something like this. If what you’re doing isn’t working, do something/anything else. The behavioral issues, including their roots, get a lot of attention from the mental health community. Both perpetrators and their victims need better access to counseling. The legal community needs to start from scratch in reforming its response to the crime of domestic violence. What they’re doing isn’t working.

Seattle Times Article

 
© 2012 HSI Investigations, A Seattle Private Investigator